Poll of Web Designers: Price of Website Design

Figuring out what is the “going rate” for website design can be a tough task — for clients and professional web designers alike.

Ask ten web designers what they charge, and you’ll likely get ten different answers.  There are so many factors that go into the cost of website design:  Location, experience, charging by the hour vs per project, the list goes on…

So we decided to conduct a poll of web designers to find out what they charge for website design.  Initiated in October of 2012, This poll is never-ending, and the results are updated in real-time below.

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So Tell Us, Web Designers:  How Much Do You Charge?

Poll Results: Price of Website Design

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Do you charge on an hourly or project basis?
I charge hourly
14%
45
I charge flat project fees
34%
112
A mix of both
53%
177
What is your hourly rate?
$10-$24/hour
9%
29
$25-$49/hour
19%
64
$50-$74/hour
18%
61
$75-$99/hour
11%
35
$100-$124/hour
5%
15
$125-$149/hour
1%
2
$150+/hour
2%
5
Typical total price for a one-page website?
$100 - $499
52%
174
$500 - $999
27%
90
$1000 - $1499
11%
35
$1500 - $1999
5%
15
$2000 - $2499
2%
6
$2500 - $2999
2%
8
$3000+
2%
6
Typical total price for a multi-page CMS website?
$100 - $2499
54%
181
$2500 - $4999
29%
97
$5000 - $9999
11%
38
$10,000 - $14,999
3%
9
$15,000 - $19,999
1%
3
$20,000+
2%
6
Typical total price for an E-Commerce website?
$100 - $2499
25%
83
$2500 - $4999
31%
104
$5000 - $9999
26%
88
$10,000 - $14,999
12%
39
$15,000 - $19,999
2%
7
$20,000+
4%
13

Brian Reflects on Freelance Jam, One Year Later

It’s been about a year since Dave and I started Freelance Jam.  So I took a moment to write out some of my thoughts on what I get out of doing the show.  Needless to say, it’s been a blast to see the show develop over the course of 2011 and I’m looking forward to all that we have in store for 2012!

Read:  Freelance Jam, One Year Later

Q&A: Do You Separate Business Blogging From Personal Blogging?

In last week’s episode, we chatted with Amber Weinberg (@amberweinberg) all about blogging.  It was a fun topic since all three of us are heavy bloggers, yet we all take a different approach.

Amber’s blog at amberweinberg.com might be considered (to a certain extent) her personal blog, offering ideas and advice to her peers—fellow freelancers and web developers.  But this same site also serves as her portfolio/business site, where she attracts clients.  This seems to work out well for her considering her blog audience and clients are largely the same group of people.

Dave seems to take a different approach.  Dave does most of his blogging at anywhereman.com, with an intended audience of freelancers and web workers.  But he keeps his business/portfolio site separate, at liftdevelopment.com.  There, he also has a blog, which is clearly targeted more at potential clients.

I keep my personal blogging separate as well, spewing thoughts and ideas at briancasel.com.  My business site, casjam.com currently doesn’t even have a blog, though I’m planning on adding an “insights” section there soon.  For me, those who may follow my personal blogging about entrepreneurship and whatnot are a different audience than my potential clients.

Over to you.

Do you keep a separation between your personal blogging and business blogging?  Why (or why not)?

 

POLL: What’s The Best Time of Day For The Live Freelance Jam Broadcast?

One of our main goals for Freelance Jam is to have a lively and interactive LIVE broadcast of every episode.  We want to extend the “roundtable” format of the show beyond just us and our guest to include those of you who join in the live chat.

Currently, our live broadcast is scheduled for every other Tuesday night at 8:00PM EST.  But we’re questioning whether or not this is the best time slot.

So in an effort to attract the largest live audience possible, we’re asking you to tell us what time of the day are you most likely to tune in?

Of the following potential show times, select up to three time slots that you'd most likely set aside time to watch:

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Q&A: Do you charge a deposit for new projects? How much?

Another topic from last week’s episode about getting paid was the deposit on a new project. The more your getting paid up front, the closer you are moving to a positive cash flow.

So how much do you charge up front? 25%, 50%, or maybe even the full cost of the project? Tell us about your approach on deposits.

 

 

Q&A: Do you charge by the hour or use a flat project fee?

One of the topics we discussed in this week’s episode was charging by the hour versus charging a flat fee for a website project. Mike and I revealed that we typically go with an hourly fee, while Brian charges clients a flat project fee.

So we want to know how YOU price and bill your projects. Hourly? Flat fee? Or something else like a percentage of profit? Let us know!